With almost all mechanical keyboard manufacturers, a common thread seems to be going in the direction of making a ten-keyless design and then adding some flair of LED color to it. HyperX is no different, with the launch of the HyperX Alloy FPS mechanical gaming keyboard. Here it is in all of its glory, with a steel frame, some red LEDs, and a minimal design that works well.

Here are some of the key specifications that the keyboard brings to the table, shown below.

  • Solid steel frame
  • CHERRY® MX mechanical keyswitches
  • Portable design with detachable cable
  • Game Mode, 100-percent Anti-Ghosting and N-key rollover functions
  • HyperX red backlit keys with dynamic lighting effects

Without the ten key design built in, there’s extra space for the mouse now to operate on the table. It has a detachable cable but no USB pass through port. The cable is braided and feels durable. There’s a set of media controls on the function row, though they’re not dedicated. Keyswitches are responsive and have a nice click to them, a little bit more pronounced than some of the other switches I’ve used in my opinion.

The Alloy FPS works quite well for my current setup. My one room setup is rather small, making every inch count. The removal of the number pad on the right side of the keyboard, which felt different at first, actually worked quite well and gave me a decent amount of extra space to throw things around on my desk. I enjoyed this variant a little bit more than its ten-keyed big brother, simply due to the sizing and the better feel of the keys on this keyboard. There was something about these keys in my testing that just felt more responsive, despite them having the same switches. It may very well just be my head playing tricks on me, but I did find a more positive experience with this unit than I did with some of the other keyboards in the HyperX lineup that I have gotten to use in the past few months. It’s also one of those small sizes where I can get away with putting it in my backpack and carrying it with me on the go – it’s just that small. I don’t miss the larger size keyboard for my particular situation at all, and while I have one at the ready as a backup I don’t foresee myself pulling it out any time soon.

While this keyboard doesn’t have as many bells and whistles as, say, the Alloy Elite, or some of the other competition that exists out there, the minimalistic design is well-made and sturdy enough to last through some long gaming activities. The keyboard thankfully didn’t move around during gameplay, and at the price range asked for this keyboard, it’s a great introduction to the world of mechanical keyboards and a good alternative to keep in mind. It’s an easy recommendation for those who wish to improve on their gaming at an affordable price of $79.99.