Just shy of hitting two weeks on the market, Hello Games‘ No Man’s Sky has had its share of misfortune. Following a lukewarm-to-slightly-negative reception, this highly anticipated space exploration game has been riddled with bugs. Constant crashes, stuttering frame rates on both PS4 and PC, and other technical difficulties have plagued No Man’s Sky until the most recent patch.

Many players, including critics, have been underwhelmed by the seeming lack of content, despite the universe touting an alleged 18 quintillion planets. Though the vastness of space is at their fingertips, players have grown bored of the repetitive collection of materials and procedurally generated environments and animal life.

tweet by user Britbongreturns directed at Sean Murray, head of Hello Games and creative director of No Man’s Sky, has received a whopping 40,000 retweets and 70,000 likes. The message contained one word: “Apologize.” Alongside the short request came a video, seen below. The video has since been deleted from the tweet, citing a copyright claim by the original holder.

The negative reaction of the playerbase is definitely taking its toll on No Man’s Sky, as even more bad news is being brought to light: the player count.

Since release on August 11, player count for No Man’s Sky has dropped from 200,000 concurrent players (its highest peak on launch day) to a mere 20,000. A near 80% drop in player activity is devastating for almost any title, and should be even more alarming for a game as ludicrously hyped as No Man’s Sky. Granted, any title is bound to have a fall in population, but it does not seem to bode well for the future of the game, especially with Murray claiming DLC is in the works. Keep in mind these are also PC numbers only, but it’s safe to say that the drop-off is fairly similar on PS4.

Whether No Man’s Sky will continue to receive support further down the road, including the much desired true multiplayer, is unclear. Murray and Co. can at least thank their lucky stars for over a million copies sold and also that they don’t have Battleborn levels of player activity.

For Gamer Professionals’ Jordan Aslett’s review of No Man’s Sky, click here.